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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 21  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 65-70

Coping, resilience, and hopefulness among women survivors of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV)


1 PhD Scholar, Department of Clinical Psychology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Professor, Trauma Recovery Clinic, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Ms. K S Shilpa
Department of Clinical Psychology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/AMH.AMH_42_20

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Context: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is the most common form of violence experienced by women. This can take the form of physical, sexual, financial, and emotional violence. The short-term as well as long-term consequences of IPV are significant. Aims: To examine trauma-specific coping self-efficacy, resilience, and hopefulness following IPV among women in short stay shelter homes. Settings and Design: The sample consisted of 30 women aged between 19 and 56 years from three shelter homes in Bengaluru, India. Materials and Methods: A sociodemographic data sheet along with four scales, Kessler's Psychological Distress Scale (K-10), Trauma Coping Self-Efficacy (CSE) Scale (CSE-T), Connor–Davidson Resilience Scale, and Adult Hope Scale (AHS), were administered to the participants of the study. Statistical Analysis Used: The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics to describe the sample and examine the interrelationships among the variables. Results: There was a significant negative relationship (r = −0.489) between level of distress and trauma CSE. A significant positive relationship (r = 0.524) was found between trauma CSE and resilience. There were also significant positive relationships (r = 0.618) among trauma CSE and goal-directed determination and pathways (AHS agency and pathways). Conclusions: The study helps in understanding the risk for psychopathology among these women as well as in indicating measures to be taken in devising psychosocial interventions for women who have experienced IPV. The details of the study and its implications are discussed.


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