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REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 64-68

Dementia in india: It's high time to address the need!


Specialist Registrar in Old age Psychiatry, Black Country Partnership NHS Foundation Trust. Honorary Lecturer, Centre for Ageing and Mental Health, Staffordshire University, Stafford, UK

Correspondence Address:
Farooq Khan
Specialist Registrar in Old age Psychiatry, Black Country Partnership NHS Foundation Trust. Honorary Lecturer, Centre for Ageing and Mental Health, Staffordshire University. BL 167 Blackheath Lane, Stafford ST18 0AD
UK
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


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The situation in India with regards to dementia prevalence has not been researched thoroughly though there have been indications of prevalence according to the 10/66 Dementia study which was conducted in seven low and middle income countries in eleven sites which included both rural and urban India. The population trend projects to a rise from 5.63% of older adults in 1961 to 6.58% in 1991 reaching 7.5 per cent in 2001. Men between the age group of 75 - 79 years and women of same age group account to 57% and 157% of dementia sufferers respectively. This figure rises to 11% and 294% when the age group of 80 years and above is considered. The educational background, social status, urban / rural living, understanding of assessment process and validation of the assessment tools used are to be taken into account when diagnosing somebody with dementia. Large families living together for generations in the same house provide supportive care to the elderly they also are affected by the carer burden. This in turn has an effect on the negative economy due to lack of income generation by that member of family in addition to the psychosocial stress faced by them. India is currently spending INR 0.15 to 160 billion per year for care of people with dementia. It is predicted that the current number of people with dementia would double by 2030 (3.69 million to 7.61 million) and the immediate consequence would be that the cost of care would also double.


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